Tuesday, November 3, 2009

Final Essay 451

In a topic sentence/ thesis statement, answer one of the following questions--going beyond the literal meaning of the texts:

Topics: What are Bradbury and Vonnegut trying to say about the price of progress? What do Bradbury and Vonnegut say that it takes to challenge the system?

70 comments:

  1. In Fahrenheit 451, The Pedestrian, and Harrison Bergeron, the societies and technology have drastically progressed. Even though all this progress seems like a good thing at first, there is a cost to all this progress, such as a lack of feeling and a lack of memory, a disregard for knowledge, and no free will for the people.

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  2. In Fahrenheit 451, The Pedestrian, & Harrison Bergeron, Bradbury and Vonnegut are explaining that the price of progress is high. People loose relationships, knowledge, and meaning for their lives.

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  4. Ray Bradbury, the author of Fahrenheit 451 and The Pedestrian, and Vonnegut, who wrote Harrison Begeron, explore the idea of the negative impacts involving technological progression in our society, by highlighting the loss of knowledge in the civilization, homogenization of man kind, and in the means by which human race takes on ideas.

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  5. In The Pedestrian, Fahrenheit 451, and Harrison Bergeron by Bradbury and Vonnegut, a character from each story rebels and tries to fight to overcome the harsh laws of their societies. In order to do this the characters must have an open mind, an extensive sum of knowledge and be able to revolutionize and transform an idea into actions.

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  6. Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut, the famous authors of Fahrenheit 451, “The Pedestrian”, and “Harrison Bergernon”, warn readers of the price that progression and development have by showing and investigating the importance of knowledge, challenging the system, and human emotions.

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  7. To a kid, a world of televisions on every wall and minimal effort needed in school sounds like heaven on earth; however, oblivious to the big picture, children struggle to see that this “wonderful” progress has a price tag. The progress society has made in Fahrenheit 451, The Pedestrian, and Harrison Bergeron all display false feelings, a society too reliant on technology, and the destruction of the social skills and human interaction we once had.

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  9. Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut, have mostly different ideas about the price of progress, but they also have a few similar ideas as well. Bradbury expresses the price of progress in “The Pedestrian” and Fahrenheit 451 by abnormalities of people, Vonnegut expresses in “Harrison Bergeron” by the use of citizen suffering, and both authors show this by expressing the governments control in The Pedestrian, Fahrenheit 451, and Harrison Bergeron.

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  10. I think what bradburry and Vonnegut are trying to say about what it takes to challenge the system is, that it can take your life (either changing it or ending it). in Harrison Bergeron the empress and the emperor decide to break free of society and challenge it.... they end up getting shot by a lady and her 10 gauge. In farenheit 451 if you challenge the syastem by having books your thrown in jail and your ife is altered from then on, or you can be like that one lady and burn your self up also.

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  12. What Bradbury and Vonnegut are trying to say is that to challenge the system you have to be willing to give your all to your cause.

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  15. In Fahrenheit 451, The Pedestrian, and Harrison Bergeron the authors, Bradbury and Vonnegut, are trying to tell us that sometimes the progress we want isn't worth the price being asked which in some cases are the lose of relationships, knowledge, and even the loss of our lives.

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  17. In the stories "Fahrenheit 451", "The Pedestrian", and "Harrison Bergeron", the authors Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut convey a society in which over use of technology and equality is very prevalent. Even though these societies are "advanced" their citizens do not realize that this progress cost them their independence, their emotions, and their intelligence.

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  18. In their novels and stories, Fahrenheit 451, “The Pedestrian,” and “Harrison Bergeron,” authors Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut affirm that challenging the system not only takes courage, but also the appropriate knowledge and the time to analyze and question the system in effect.

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  19. The novel Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury, and the short story "Harrison Bergeron", by Kurt Vonnegut, show the price of being overrun by technology and the lives of friends or family lost, after moving forward in society.

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  20. Bradbury and Vonnegut are trying to demonstrate that although progress and technology can be useful and productive, the price can include a lack of personal feelings, an addiction to technology, and the absence of wisdom. They also show that it can be almost impossible to go back to life without this progress and that it takes a strong, dedicated person to stand up to it.

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  21. In the stories Fahrenheit 451, "The Pedestrian", and "Harrison Bergeron" the authors, Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut, have ways to tell readers that challenging the system is dangerous and risky; however, sometimes one must step and question the system to show what is truly right.

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  22. In Fahrenheit 451 and Harrison Bergeron, the authors, Bradbury and Vonnegut, portray a life where technology takes the happiness, Love and friendship, and history out of the characters world.

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  23. In the stories Farenheit 451 and Harrison Bergeron, there are significant losses when advances are made, such losses are the ability to think freely, love, and the sense of what is right.

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  24. In Ray Bradburys Farenheight 451 and The Pedestrian, and Vonneguts Harrison Bergerson, the message that the price of progress is high, is shown and the fact that it could cost love, real happiness, and knowledge.

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  26. The authors of Fahrenheit 451, "The Pedestrian", and "Harrison Bergeron", Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut, both explore the ideas that the price of progress is high. According to these authors, for society to technologically advance a loss of knowledge and a lack of emotion must be present. Mankind must regress until people have no free will or the ability to make decisions on their own. The people of each story do not truly know what happiness is, how to love, or how to react to other human beings. For society to progress, sacrifices must be made.

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  27. In the stories 'Fahrenheit 451' and 'Harrison Bergeron', by authors Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut, both have characters that challenge the system. According to these authors, the elements needed to challenge the system are realizing there is a problem, going against what the high power is saying, and creating a better future.

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  28. The authors of Fahrenheit 451 and “Harrison Bergeron” both examine the concept of the price of progress. In these stories, the price is mainly knowledge, emotions, and the ability for one to make their own choices.

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  29. In the book Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and the story “Harrison Bergeron” by Kurt Vonnegut there are characters in each story that are dissatisfied with the rules or laws of their society. To be able to step out of conformity and challenge the system, you must have courage, a sense of who you are and who you want to be, and the will to do whatever it takes to succeed in the battle.

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  30. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and The Pedestrian by Kurt Vonnegut are both stories that show how progression in society and advances in technology can be both good and bad. In these stories it seems to have a more negetive effect on how people treat eachother, what they think is equal, and what they believe true happiness and love is.

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  31. In the stories "Fahrenheit 451", and "Harrison Bergeron" the authors seem to press one thing-equality being broken by challenging the system. In such a story many things unfold and show what it really takes to pentrate the system, and one learns that what it takes is knowledge, a sense of denial, and a little push.

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  33. Farenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and "Harrison Bergeron" by Kurt Vonnegut both display characters that disagree with the laws of society. In order to challenge the system in which they live, both authors depict qualities in their characters such as courage and resistance.

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  34. Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonegut illustrate in their stories, Farenheit 451 and Harrison Bergeron that as the enconomic progress goes up which is traditionally considered progress does not replace intelectual progress.

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  35. Despite the differences between plots in ray Bradburry's and Kurt Vonnegut's futuristic stories, they both prove that progess in society triggers an absence of personal identity, loss of grooundings and safety, and the demise of personal authority to people who conform to it.

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  36. The progress shown in Fahrenheit 451 and The Pedestrian, by Ray Bradbury and Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut are firmly idealist and egalitarian bound,which may seem like a good thing, but there is quite a price to pay; the ability to build and maintain relationships is lost, an individual's independence and intellect are lost, and there is a full reliance on technology, which means no more books.

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  37. Bradbury and Vonnegut both have similar ideas in what the future will hold, how all of their characters will challenge the system by being normal on our terms, or not being equal as their society states they should, or even just speaking their mind.

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  38. In Fahrenheit 451, The Pedestrian, and Harrison Bergeron, Bradbury and Vonnegut tell us what is required to challenge the system. For a meaningful cause, a person must act against the popular norm, and with their own, believe that the society is in the wrong, and sacrifice something of importance.

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  39. In Bradbury's Farenheit 451 and The Pedestrian, and Vonnegut's Harrison Bergeron the main characters' challenge the system by questioning society, thinking critically, rebelling against the government, and showing humanity.

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  41. Ray Bradbury, the author of both Fahrenheit 451 and The Pedestrian, and Kurt Vonnegut , the author of Harrison Bergeron both reveal a common thread in their stories. That common is revealed in such a way that shows how the price of progress has an effect on how the people obey the government, how they lack the ability to feel emotion for one another, and how technology soon controls every aspect about their life.

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  42. In the books Fahrenheit 451, The Pedestrian, and Harrison Bergeron authors Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut are trying to convey the message that the progress we are making is going to come at a very heavy price. The people are going to lose many things including social connections, knowledge, and personality.

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  43. The notion of most things in our daily life being electronic fascinates the human mind in our present day. As portrayed by Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut in Fahrenheit 451, "The Pedestrian", and "Harrison Bergeron"; this path to making our society’s average life better, has a heavy price to pay. Both Bradbury and Vonnegut’s depiction of the future is with immense amounts of technology. This reveals that the human capacity to learn and expand their human interaction skills is limited. Therefore dragging the society and it’s people down with its, soon-to-be, downfall. After the downfall occurs, as Bradbury portrays, the society will rise from the ashes; the vicious cycle begins again and repeats.

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  44. Fahrenheit 451 and “Harrison Bergeron” authors’ Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut are of the opinion that a knowledge of the system, a reason to challenge the system, and the strength to endure hardships make challenging the system possible.

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  45. Ray Bradbury and Vonnegut try to show us the price to challenge the system in many way, however; the ways that i interprated were that you could be a total outkast in your society, you could rebel agaisnt the government, and show devotion and drive.

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  47. Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut portray in their literary works Fahrenheit 451 and "Harrison Bergeron" that with the advancement of technology comes the loss of the true meaning from your heart and soul of love, the simple concept of thinking, and external understanding of our world.

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  48. Today, we would think of progress as a positive thing, and adding new, idealistic things into our lives; however, the thoughts of Ray Bradbury, author of Farenheit 451 and The Pedestrian, and Kurt Vonnegut, the author of "Harrisson Bergeron", show us we should rid ourselves of freedom, history, and the knowledge that books and other things provide us with to step forward in society.

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  49. In Fahrenheit 451, The Pedestrian, and Harrison Bergeron, the authors Bradbury and Vonnegut, have similar characters that must challenge their society's system, because the progress of technology and life have caused people to lose who they are, their individualism.

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  50. In the stories Harrison Bergeron and Fahrenheit 451, authors Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut are trying to show us that if a society advances it often pays a heavy price, like losing the ability to think freely or communicate with one another.

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  51. Progress and it's price on society is portrayed by Bradbury and Vonnegut, the authors of Fahrenheit 451, "Harrison Bergeron", and "The Pedestrian". The portrayed outcome is due to intellectuals, the control technology has on society, and the unbalanced power of the government.

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  52. In Ray Bradbury’s book Fahrenheit 451, and the short story “Harrison Bergeron” by Kurt Vonnegut, the authors want you to constantly have the idea of challenging the system throughout the text. In these authors’ minds, to truly challenge the system means to wake up from the illusion of perfect society, separate life from the atrocities of the society and finally change the way the system affects life personally.

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  53. In today's busy world, progress is thought of as a goal: something to strive to acheive, but what people fail to see, and what Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut point out in their stories Harrison Bergeron and Fahrenheit 451, is that progress comes at a price. People can be robbed of their personality, yearning for knowledge and thought while working to "make the world a better place."

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  54. In their stories, Harrison Bergeron and Fahrenheit 451, Kurt Vonnegut and Ray Bradbury try to show their readers that progression doesn't always lead to great things. They wanted to show us what could potentially happen if we subjected everything about us to progression; they wanted readers to realize the value of individuality.

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  55. In Fahrenheit 451 and Harrison Bergeron, authors Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut are saying that it takes rebellious, innovative thinking and a reason worth fighting for to challenge the system.

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  57. In Fahrenheit 451, and Harrison Bergeron,Bradbury and Vonnegut write about societies that have progressed greatly in the way of technology. Even though this may seem like a good thing, the authors are trying to show us that the price of progress can limit a person's ability to make their own choices, separate people from society, and make people so reliant on technology that they loose their sense of individuality.

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  58. George Bernard Shaw says this about progress, ““The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.” In Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 and Kurt Voggenut’s Harrison Bergeron the unreasonable men, Montag and Harrison, sacrifice their lives and their past for the sake of progress.

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  59. In Fahrenheit 451, "Harrison Bergeron," and "The Pedestrian," authors Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut portray the unthinkable and extreme results of tecnology, that in their minds could have easily become reality if tecnology was not warily watched. Bradbury and Vonnegut both show the derastic installment of subconsious fear that is put upon the citizens; the loss and hope for regainment of love and happiness; and the sacrifice one is willing to make.

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  60. Ray Bradbury the author of Fahrenheit 451, and Kurt Vonnegut the author of Harrison Bergeron show that when progress is the main focus of society, eventually complete manipulation and control consumes the populace.

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  61. In both Fahrenheit 451 and Harrison Bergeron, the authors Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut try to convey a message about what it takes to challenge the system. They try to convey that in order to challenge the system, one must go against what they have been taught and believed to be true. They must be able to make sacrifices and not be afraid.

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  62. Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut show how challenging the system can be done through actions, but also through thought. The simple ideas can set off a society. In pieces of literature such as Fahrenheit 451, "The Pedestrian", and "Harrison Burgeron", the idea of how thinking can be the thing to upset society more than any action.

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  63. Bradbury and Vonnegut present the idea that a society is brought down by its defects and then is rebuilt with less problems than before. In order for a society to progress it must make mistakes and learn from them.

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  64. In any situation the price of progress can be high. In Fahrenheit 451, The Pedestrian, and Harrison Bergeron, Progressiveness can lead people to challenge the system, and for people to be overly dependent on objects.

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  65. Two authors Bradbury and Vonnegut both express the idea of challenging the system in their writing. Both authors show that to challenge the system you need totally different thinking than that created the system ; and the system will do its best not to be changed.

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  67. To challenge the system, Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut say to be your own man/woman and believe what you want. To do this, you need to be assertive, have your own personality, and be different.

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  68. In order to challenge the system, it takes never ending courage, complete and utter defiance to the current system in play, and undying respect and support towards the challenge being made to the system in place.

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  69. If you want to be the Best Essays in your paper. You need to work it hard, to achieve it.

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